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Did vaccines cause Spanish Flu deaths in 1918?

The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 infected 500 million people, 20% of the world’s population and killed over 60 million people. This is roughly three times as many people as were killed and maimed in World War One, and is comparable to WWII losses. Yet this modern plague has slipped down the memory hole. Why?  Was it a deliberate ploy by the Illuminati to finish the job WWI began?

At a 1944 Nazi bacteriological warfare conference in Berlin, General Walter Schreiber, Chief of the Medical Corps of the German Army told Mueller that he had spent two months in the US in 1927 conferring with his counterparts. They told him that the “so-called double blow virus” (i.e. Spanish Flu) was developed and used during the 1914 war. “But,” according to Mueller, the virus got out of control and killed massive numbers of the people.

James Kronthal, the CIA Bern Station Chief asked Mueller to explain “double blow virus.” Mueller responded saying, the ‘double-blow’ referred to a virus, or actually a pair of them that worked like a prize fighter. The first blow attacked the immune system and made the victim susceptible, fatally so, to the second blow which was a form of pneumonia and that a British scientist actually developed it.

The subject of the Spanish Flu arose in the context of a discussion of typhus. The Nazis deliberately introduced typhus into Russian POW camps and, along with starvation, killed about three million men. The typhus spread to Auschwitz and other concentration camps with Russian and Polish POWS.

In the context of the Cold War, Mueller said then, if Stalin invades Europe, a little disease here and there would wipe out Stalin’s hoards and leave everything intact. Besides, a small bottle of germs is so much cheaper than an atom bomb.

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